The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Caught Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day…

To me, the great promise of homeschooling is that one day your child might, on their own initiative, ride the New York City subways dressed in a homemade, needlefelted costume modeled on the ice-skating bird messenger from Hieronymus Bosch’s The Temptation of St. Anthony. Rae Stimson, aka Rae Swon, a Brooklyn-based artist who did just that […]

The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Caught Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day… is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don’t miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Caught Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day… appeared first on IACCCE.

More

The post The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Caught Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day… appeared first on House Of Harmony.

The post The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Caught Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day… appeared first on Dr. Harmony.

The post The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Caught Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day… appeared first on Sex Positive Academy.

Source: spa

William Shatner Is Releasing a Christmas Album with Iggy Pop & Henry Rollins : Get a First Listen to “Jingle Bells”

You know what they say: each year the Christmas season seems to start a little earlier. Here it’s not yet October, and already we’re hearing “Jingle Bells” — but then, this version doesn’t sound quite like any we’ve heard before. The song comes as the opening number on Shatner Claus: The Christmas Album, which promises exactly what it sounds like it does. Officially dropping on October 26th, it will contain, according to Consequence of Sound, William Shatner’s “unique take on 13 holiday staples,” and feature guest contributors like Iggy Pop on “Silent Night,” ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons on “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” and former Black Flag frontman and all-around provocateur Henry Rollins on “Jingle Bells,” a collaboration you can stream just above.

You may not describe Shatner’s distinctive half-singing-half-speaking style as possessed of a great “range,” technically speaking, but who can doubt the formidable cultural range of his musical career? On his debut album The Transformed Man fifty years ago he covered the Beatles, ten years later he took on “Rocket Man,” and more recently he appeared on Dr. Demento’s punk album singing The Cramps’ “Garbage Man” with Weird Al Yankovic.

Shatner Claus demonstrates that the former Captain Kirk’s interest in punk rock hasn’t dissipated, and the pairing of him and no less an icon of that genre makes a certain kind of sense, seeing as both of them have spent decades blurring the performative line between singing and the spoken word, each in his own distinctive way.

Perhaps it comes as no surprise, then, that Shatner and Rollins are friends, and have been since they first recorded together on Shatner’s album Has Been in 2004. Rollins once described Shatner to rock site Blabbermouth as “extraordinarily friendly, a very energized guy” despite being three decades the  middle-aged Rollins’ senior. “He impresses me in that he’s a guy who’s really figured out what he likes,” especially football: “I’ve been to the Shatner house many times for dinner, for Super Bowl Sunday, for football games. I don’t watch football, but I like his friends. I’m a shy person. I don’t really go out of my way to hang out but I like him and his wife… and I like all the food he lays out.” The vast game-day spreads at chez Shatner have also given Rollins stories to tell at his spoken-word shows, and listening to Shatner Claus, you have to wonder: what must they have for Christmas dinner?

via Consequence of Sound

Related Content:

Dr. Demento’s New Punk Album Features William Shatner Singing The Cramps, Weird Al Yankovic Singing The Ramones & Much More

A Cult Classic: William Shatner Sings Elton John’s “Rocket Man” at 1978 SciFi Awards Show

William Shatner Sings Nearly Blasphemous Version of “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” (1968)

Stream a Playlist of 68 Punk Rock Christmas Songs: The Ramones, The Damned, Bad Religion & More

Hear the 20 Favorite Punk Albums of Black Flag Frontman Henry Rollins

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. His projects include the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

William Shatner Is Releasing a Christmas Album with Iggy Pop & Henry Rollins : Get a First Listen to “Jingle Bells” is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don’t miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post William Shatner Is Releasing a Christmas Album with Iggy Pop & Henry Rollins : Get a First Listen to “Jingle Bells” appeared first on IACCCE.

The post William Shatner Is Releasing a Christmas Album with Iggy Pop & Henry Rollins : Get a First Listen to “Jingle Bells” appeared first on House Of Harmony.

The post William Shatner Is Releasing a Christmas Album with Iggy Pop & Henry Rollins : Get a First Listen to “Jingle Bells” appeared first on HiveMind Community.

The post William Shatner Is Releasing a Christmas Album with Iggy Pop & Henry Rollins : Get a First Listen to “Jingle Bells” appeared first on Sex Positive Academy.

Source: spa

Sex talk: What even the most vanilla among us can learn from the BDSM community

Little Village

How do we reframe our expectations so we are not constantly critical of ourselves or our partner? Let’s move away from who-does-what-to-whom and towards a curious and honest exploration of guiding principles that impact mindset. How do I get into the mindset of sex being a place we go, instead of what we do to each other? How do we explore our sexual appetite without anxiety or the pressure of an outcome?

Source: ncsf

Why I Didn’t Get Smartphone Until Now

I’m in my late twenties, and I just got a smartphone. I know, I know, I was met with incredulous stares from the professionals at AT&T, along with everyone else I knew for being quite “behind the times.” But alas, my non-smartphone naturally became obsolete, less functional, and decided to unfortunately bid me one final goodbye.

So why did I wait so long, anyway? Why did I wait until I basically had no choice but to take the iPhone plunge? Do I need to authorize a case study? Well, no, I don’t think it’s that serious, but psychologically speaking, I clearly had reservations about this technological advancement.

The answer is simplicity. That’s the crux of why I delayed this change every time I needed a new phone and decided to forego the smartphone upgrade and opt for the classic throwback, for an older model, for a phone that’s centered around calling and texting and nothing more. The simplicity of the non-smartphone is what I reveled in — the fact that I didn’t need to download various apps or have the Internet constantly at my fingertips was a relief. I wasn’t keen on all the stimulation, all the choices. It was “a bit much,” I’d relay. I wouldn’t say I was literally “‘overwhelmed,” but I was not seeking a phone that had every feature under the sun. I claimed that I would rather use the Internet on my laptop; I would rather keep technical devices separate.

Nowadays, everyone is moving fast. Everyone is on the go. We use hashtags and abbreviations and pictures online to sum up our lives. I see lists on Buzzfeed and short articles that are structured so that the reader can quickly scan for a summary. The market for the literary essay and the novel, for elongated prose, isn’t as fruitful as it once was (at least I don’t seem to think so). Everyone grabs their information and entertainment as quick as they come, whether it’s through social media glimpses, an app or an online game. (Of course, I’m generalizing right now, and of course, there’s probably a spectrum where some find more of a middle ground, myself included.)

I suppose I’m trying to hone in on a larger point, on a bigger picture. I suppose I’m trying to connect the dots between a societal trend and the way the smartphone seems to parallel alongside it, which is why I held onto my basic phone for years and years.

We all have our own personalities, our own pace, and I tend to move a bit slower; I tend to take my time and not have too many tasks to do at once. I’m a middle-of-the-road kind of girl. That’s just me. I fantasize about having a summer cottage off the coast of Maine, a few blocks away from the ocean or a bay. I would write, and I would breathe in the sea air and take in the quaint, idyllic charm.

And if push comes to shove, it’s not that I can’t juggle and be “on the go” if need be, but in my day to day, I would rather keep a simple pace if possible; it’s just less stressful that way, less chaotic.

Needless to say, I’m sure I will acclimate and bond with my new phone in my own fashion. (I must say, I am eager to explore all the emoji galore since I like adding some ‘flair’ to my text messages, and the beautiful camera is a plus since I didn’t even have a working camera prior.) So there it is. I can own a smartphone and still remain on middle ground. I don’t have to download every app, nor do I even have to browse the Internet, or succumb to its other perks.

I can utilize the phone in my own way. Perhaps I can find an emoji of Maine.

The post Why I Didn’t Get Smartphone Until Now appeared first on HiveMind Community.

The post Why I Didn’t Get Smartphone Until Now appeared first on Sex Positive Academy.

Source: spa

The Gift of Self-Compassion

Feeling love and compassion for others can be difficult. But holding ourselves with love and compassion can be even more challenging. Why do we often treat ourselves in ways that we’d never treat others? And what would it take to bring more compassion to ourselves?

Plato has famously said, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” This wise perception also applies to ourselves. Each of us has faced betrayals, adversities, and losses — and sadly, more difficulties probably lie ahead. Life would be less stressful and more fulfilling as we learn the art of self-compassion.

Why is Self-Compassion So Difficult?

We may have internalized the message that we don’t deserve happiness. Perhaps we grew up with neglect or abuse rather than receiving the consistent message that children need: we have worth and value — and we are loved. An attachment injury may make it difficult to feel safely connected with ourselves and others

Self-compassion is also difficult if we cling to memories of our failures or the hurtful things we’ve done when we were younger and less wise. We may minimize the good things about ourselves and our positive contributions.

As neuroscientists know, our brain has a negativity bias. Our survival as a species is based partly upon our ability to scan the environment for danger so that we can avoid injury and destruction. There is scant survival value in relaxing and relishing the beauty within us and around us, although doing so may be part of an evolutionary process that enables us to move from surviving to thriving.

Self-compassion begins by realizing that we have a right to be happy. In fact, the founding fathers of the United States felt that the pursuit of happiness is so important that it became enshrined in the U.S. Constitution.

However, this doesn’t mean that happiness is an entitlement. Living a fulfilling life requires creating the necessary foundation. It takes work and the right kind of attention. This includes living an ethical, connected life. It’s impossible to find inner peace and happiness if we’re oblivious to others’ needs and the world around us — or worse, if we’re harming people. Our narcissism not only damages others, but it is also destructive to ourselves as it constricts us to a small, isolated world

Loving Ourselves

Finding inner peace and happiness means cultivating compassion toward ourselves. This is easier said than done. Self-love and self-compassion is more than just being good to ourselves, such as soaking in a hot tub or buying nice things.

Self-compassion is an inner job. It has to do with how we hold ourselves, how we relate to our feelings. It means finding the strength and resilience to embrace the full range of our human emotions. It means tapping into inner resources that can meet our feelings with a gentle embrace rather than with judgment.

Being human means sometimes wrestling with uncomfortable emotions. The next time you find yourself feeling sad, lonely, afraid, hurt, embarrassed, or some other distasteful feeling, you might want to try this: take a few gentle breaths and then notice how this feeling is living in your body right now. Is your bodily-felt sensation prickly, tight, heavy, jumpy, or …? See if you can allow the emotion and the bodily sensation connected with it to simply be there without judging the feeling or criticizing yourself for having it. Can you allow it to be there without being afraid of it and without feeling shame around it? Or simply notice the fear or shame and maybe you can find a way to be gentle with that feeling too.

Compassion means accepting ourselves as we are. It means meeting our feelings with love and gentleness rather than trying to fix ourselves or get rid of them. It means being our own best friend.

It may sound strange, but being compassionate toward ourselves also serves others. Feeling more peace inside, we have more to offer. By becoming more familiar and gentle with our own feelings, we can extend compassionate attention toward others when they are feeling distressed or challenged.

The post The Gift of Self-Compassion appeared first on HiveMind Community.

The post The Gift of Self-Compassion appeared first on Sex Positive Academy.

Source: spa

What Makes a Good Mental Health Advocate?

I have been fortunate over the years to share the story of my son Dan’s recovery from severe obsessive-compulsive disorder. The fact that he continues to do so well is concrete evidence that obsessive-compulsive disorder, no matter how severe, is indeed treatable, and it is gratifying to know that many who are suffering have found hope through my family’s story.

I hear from many people who are at various stages in their fight against OCD. When they tell me they have either read about Dan’s journey or heard me speak about him the first question they often ask is “How is Dan now?”

I am so incredibly thankful that the answer, after eight years, continues to be, “He is doing very well.”

The next question is usually something such as, “Where is he? How come we never see him at these conferences/meetings/or other OCD events?”

It is an interesting question. Should “OCD advocacy” (or advocacy for other illnesses) be a responsibility of those who have recovered from severe OCD? I don’t know. But I do know that advocacy comes in many ways, shapes, and forms. By continuing to do well, keeping his OCD at bay, and living his life to the fullest, Dan is giving hope to all those who suffer from OCD.

But still. What an inspiration it would be to those who are suffering to hear as many success stories as possible. While there are those who do speak up and take on the role of a traditional advocate, many people who recover from severe OCD just want to get on with their lives. And who can blame them?

My son falls into this category. As he and many others have said “OCD is something I have, not something I am.” Dan does not want to be defined by OCD and has made a conscious effort to put it on the back burner and focus wholeheartedly on living his life to the fullest. He has fought his way back from the brink of despair, and perhaps this fact fuels his resolve to leave OCD out of his life as much as he can. Maybe my son’s choice to not focus on his OCD any more than he needs to is one of the reasons he has learned to cope so well.

I do feel that each of us has a responsibility to try to make the world a better place, but how we do that is up to us. My son might not be shouting from the rooftops now that he has overcome severe OCD, but maybe at some point in his life, sharing his story will become important to him as a means to help others. If not, I am confident that he will find other ways, as he has done already, to make the world a better place.

For now, however, I will revel in the fact that Dan is doing well. I will continue to advocate for OCD awareness and proper treatment, and I will respect his decision to not want to make OCD a focal point of his life. Because after all, isn’t that the whole idea?

The post What Makes a Good Mental Health Advocate? appeared first on HiveMind Community.

The post What Makes a Good Mental Health Advocate? appeared first on Sex Positive Academy.

Source: spa

The History of the Guitar & Guitar Legends: From 1929 to 1979

In the age of the Classical Education, students pored over and memorized the works of “authorities,” exemplars of grammar, rhetoric, logic, etc. Constellations in the night sky of ignorance, so to speak, these writers and thinkers showed the way to knowledge through their excellence. The method may have fallen out of favor in modern pedagogy, […]

The History of the Guitar & Guitar Legends: From 1929 to 1979 is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don’t miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post The History of the Guitar & Guitar Legends: From 1929 to 1979 appeared first on IACCCE.

More

The post The History of the Guitar & Guitar Legends: From 1929 to 1979 appeared first on House Of Harmony.

The post The History of the Guitar & Guitar Legends: From 1929 to 1979 appeared first on Dr. Harmony.

The post The History of the Guitar & Guitar Legends: From 1929 to 1979 appeared first on Sex Positive Academy.

Source: spa

How Meditation Can Change Your Brain: The Neuroscience of Buddhist Practice

Nirvana is a place on earth. Popularly thought of a Buddhist “heaven,” religious scholars discuss the concept not as an arrival at someplace other than the physical place we are, but as the extinction of suffering in the mind, achieved in large part through intensive meditation. If this state of enlightenment exists in the here […]

How Meditation Can Change Your Brain: The Neuroscience of Buddhist Practice is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don’t miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The post How Meditation Can Change Your Brain: The Neuroscience of Buddhist Practice appeared first on IACCCE.

More

The post How Meditation Can Change Your Brain: The Neuroscience of Buddhist Practice appeared first on House Of Harmony.

The post How Meditation Can Change Your Brain: The Neuroscience of Buddhist Practice appeared first on Dr. Harmony.

The post How Meditation Can Change Your Brain: The Neuroscience of Buddhist Practice appeared first on Sex Positive Academy.

Source: spa

Here's How a Therapist Coaches Couples Who Decide to Have Sex With Other People

Time

“I very rarely see that rules create security in these situations. How can we possibly anticipate all the possibilities? It’s an attempt to control, but it might make people feel more out of control,” he said. He told us that in his work with couples practicing CNM, he kept the focus on their attachment bond and let them come up with the rules without getting too involved in that himself. In his experience, he said, the rules might change or even fade out in time if the relationship security is sufficiently strong. “My job is to help people who have decided not to be monogamous keep turning back to each other if they feel insecure or flooded with fear. That way a negative becomes a positive. What might weaken or sink a relationship strengthens it.”

Source: ncsf